doc/gpio.txt

2012/01/09 kernel_document

Document/gpio.txt (2.6.33.9)

お約束ですが、本文は個人的にgoogle翻訳+適当に付け加えて翻訳されています。
オリジナルのライセンスはGPLv2であり、本文もそれに追従する形をとります。
要は、変な訳文の指摘や、全体的にうまく訳した文があれば教えてくださいね、ってことで。

Linux JF (Japanese FAQ) Project.にも gpio.txtは無いのよねぇ...

※現状、後半に興味があるので、続きは後ろのほうからになります:)

訳文(途中)

GPIO Interfaces
# 
# This provides an overview of GPIO access conventions on Linux.
# 
# These calls use the gpio_* naming prefix.  No other calls should use that
# prefix, or the related __gpio_* prefix.


これはLinux上のGPIOアクセス規則の概要を説明します。

これらの呼び出しは、prefix名 "gpio_*" を使用してください。
他の呼び出しはそのprefix名、または関連するprefix名"__gpio_*"を使用しないでください。


# What is a GPIO?
# ===============
# A "General Purpose Input/Output" (GPIO) is a flexible software-controlled
# digital signal.  They are provided from many kinds of chip, and are familiar
# to Linux developers working with embedded and custom hardware.  Each GPIO
# represents a bit connected to a particular pin, or "ball" on Ball Grid Array
# (BGA) packages.  Board schematics show which external hardware connects to
# which GPIOs.  Drivers can be written generically, so that board setup code
# passes such pin configuration data to drivers.

GPIOとは?
==========
"汎用入力/出力"(GPIO)は、柔軟なソフトウェア制御のデジタル信号です。
これらは、チップのさまざまな種類から提供され、組み込みおよびカスタムハードウェアを
扱うLinux開発者によく知られています。
各GPIOがボールグリッドアレイ(BGA)パッケージの特定のピン、または"ボール"に
接続されているビットを表します。
ボード回路図は、外部ハードウェアがどのGPIOに接続しているかを示します。
ドライバは一般的に書き込むことができるので、そのボードセットアップコードは、
ドライバにそのようなピンコンフィギュレーションデータを渡します。

※訳注:
defaultでoutputにして欲しい??
bootloaderがINにしたいとか、外部接続の都合でinの方が良いケースもある。
ので、"一般的に"というので例外を弾いてるのかな。

# System-on-Chip (SOC) processors heavily rely on GPIOs.  In some cases, every
# non-dedicated pin can be configured as a GPIO; and most chips have at least
# several dozen of them.  Programmable logic devices (like FPGAs) can easily
# provide GPIOs; multifunction chips like power managers, and audio codecs
# often have a few such pins to help with pin scarcity on SOCs; and there are
# also "GPIO Expander" chips that connect using the I2C or SPI serial busses.
# Most PC southbridges have a few dozen GPIO-capable pins (with only the BIOS
# firmware knowing how they're used).

システムオンチップ(SOC)プロセッサは大きくのGPIOに依存しています。
いくつかのケースでは、すべての非専用ピンは、GPIOとして設定することができ、
ほとんどのチップは、少なくともそのうちの数十を持っている。


プログラマブルロジックデバイス(FPGAのような)簡単にGPIOを提供することができます。
多機能チップ、電源管理やオーディオコーデックは、多くの場合、
SoCのピン不足を支援するいくつかのそのようなピンを持っています。そして、
I2CまたはSPIシリアルバスを使用して接続する"GPIOエキスパンダ"のチップもあります。

ほとんどのPC southbridgesは、数十GPIOに対応したピンを持つ
(それらは慣れている方法のみBIOSファームウェアが知る付き)。


# The exact capabilities of GPIOs vary between systems.  Common options:
# 
#   - Output values are writable (high=1, low=0).  Some chips also have
#     options about how that value is driven, so that for example only one
#     value might be driven ... supporting "wire-OR" and similar schemes
#     for the other value (notably, "open drain" signaling).
# 
#   - Input values are likewise readable (1, 0).  Some chips support readback
#     of pins configured as "output", which is very useful in such "wire-OR"
#     cases (to support bidirectional signaling).  GPIO controllers may have
#     input de-glitch/debounce logic, sometimes with software controls.
# 
#   - Inputs can often be used as IRQ signals, often edge triggered but
#     sometimes level triggered.  Such IRQs may be configurable as system
#     wakeup events, to wake the system from a low power state.
# 
#   - Usually a GPIO will be configurable as either input or output, as needed
#     by different product boards; single direction ones exist too.
# 
#   - Most GPIOs can be accessed while holding spinlocks, but those accessed
#     through a serial bus normally can't.  Some systems support both types.

GPIOの正確な機能は、システムにより異なります。一般的なオプションをいかに列挙します:
 - 出力値は、(ハイ= 1、ロー= 0)書き込み可能です。
   また、いくつかのチップは、例えば、一つの値だけが駆動されるかもしれないので、
   その値がドライブされる方法についてのオプションがあります.
   .."Wired-OR"と他の値(特に、"オープンドレイン"信号)のための同様のスキームをサポートする。

  - 入力値、(1、0)も同様に読みやすいです。
   いくつかのチップは、"出力"として設定されたピンのリードバックをサポートしています。
   これは、このような"ワイヤードOR"例(双方向シグナリングをサポートする)に非常に便利です。

   GPIOコントローラは、ソフトウェア制御で、時には、入力de-glitch/debounceロジックを持つことができます。

  - 入力は、多くの場合、エッジトリガ、時々レベルトリガとしてIRQ信号に使用することができます。
  このようなIRQが低電力状態からシステムをウェイクアップする、
  システムウェイクアップイベントとして設定可能な場合があります。

  - 通常GPIOは、異なる製品ボードによって必要に応じて、
    入力または出力のいずれかとして構成されます。単方向のものも存在します。

  - ほとんどのGPIOはスピンロックを保持している間にアクセスできますが、
    シリアルバスを介してアクセスするもの、正常にすることはできません。
    一部のシステムでは、両方のタイプをサポートしています。


# On a given board each GPIO is used for one specific purpose like monitoring
# MMC/SD card insertion/removal, detecting card writeprotect status, driving
# a LED, configuring a transceiver, bitbanging a serial bus, poking a hardware
# watchdog, sensing a switch, and so on.

与えられたボード上の各GPIOは、MMC/ SDカード挿入/除去の監視、カードライトプロテクト状態を検出し、
LEDを駆動したり、トランシーバを構成したり、bitbangingシリアルバスをしたり、
ハードウェアウォッチドッグを突っついたり、スイッチを感知したり、
ある特定の目的のために使用されます。

※訳注:"bitbangingシリアルバス
 GPIOを使ってビット制御を行うUART/SPIの事だと思います。


GPIO conventions
================
# Note that this is called a "convention" because you don't need to do it this
# way, and it's no crime if you don't.  There **are** cases where portability
# is not the main issue; GPIOs are often used for the kind of board-specific
# glue logic that may even change between board revisions, and can't ever be
# used on a board that's wired differently.  Only least-common-denominator
# functionality can be very portable.  Other features are platform-specific,
# and that can be critical for glue logic.

?あなたがこの方法でそれを行う必要がないため、これは"規則"と
呼ばれることに注意してください、とそうでない場合、それは犯罪ありません。

 移植性が主要な問題ではない場合がありますが、GPIOは、多くの場合でも、
ボードのリビジョン間で変更される可能性があるボード固有のグルーロジック
の種類に使用され、これまで異なる配線のボードでは使用できません。
?唯一のleast-common-denominator(最小公分母)の機能は非常に可搬性になります。

 その他の機能は、プラットフォーム固有であり、そしてそれが
グルーロジックのための重要になることがあります。

# Plus, this doesn't require any implementation framework, just an interface.
# One platform might implement it as simple inline functions accessing chip
# registers; another might implement it by delegating through abstractions
# used for several very different kinds of GPIO controller.  (There is some
# optional code supporting such an implementation strategy, described later
# in this document, but drivers acting as clients to the GPIO interface must
# not care how it's implemented.)

加えて、これは、どのような実装のフレームワークをも必要としません。(単なるインタフェースも(?))
 一つのプラットフォームは、チップのレジスタにアクセスする簡単な
インライン関数として実装することが、別のGPIOコントローラのいくつかの
非常に異なる種類のために使用される抽象化を通じて委任することでそれを
実装する場合があります。
(そのような実装ストラテジーをサポートするいくつかのオプションの
 コードがありますが、この文書の後半で説明しますが、GPIOインタ
 フェースに対してクライアントとして動作するドライバは、
 それが実装されているか気になりません。)

# That said, if the convention is supported on their platform, drivers should
# use it when possible.  Platforms must declare GENERIC_GPIO support in their
# Kconfig (boolean true), and provide an <asm/gpio.h> file.  Drivers that can't
# work without standard GPIO calls should have Kconfig entries which depend
# on GENERIC_GPIO.  The GPIO calls are available, either as "real code" or as
# optimized-away stubs, when drivers use the include file:
# 
#   #include <linux/gpio.h>

それは、規則がそのプラットフォームでサポートされている場合、可能な場合、
ドライバーがそれを使用すべきと云っている。
プラットフォームは、kconfigを(ブール型true)でGENERIC_GPIOのサポートを
宣言し、<asm/gpio.h>ファイルを提供する必要があります。
標準GPIOの呼び出しなしでは動作しないドライバーは、GENERIC_GPIOに依存する
Kconfigのエントリを、持つことが必要です。
ドライバは、"#include <linux/gpio.h>"ファイルをインクルード使用するときに、
GPIOの呼び出しは、"実際のコード"として、または最適化された、離れたスタブの
いずれかとして、利用できます。

※訳注:
 linux/gpio.h内で、"GENERIC_GPIO"の定義/未定義で分岐しています。


# If you stick to this convention then it'll be easier for other developers to
# see what your code is doing, and help maintain it.

この規則に固執すれば、他の開発者は、コードがなにをやっているか、
そしてそれを維持するのに役立つために、それは容易になるでしょう。

# Note that these operations include I/O barriers on platforms which need to
# use them; drivers don't need to add them explicitly.

これらの操作は、それらを使用する必要があるプラットフォーム上でI / O障壁を
含めることに注意してください。
ドライバーが明示的にこれらを追加する必要はありません。



Identifying GPIOs
-----------------
#GPIOs are identified by unsigned integers in the range 0..MAX_INT.  That
#reserves "negative" numbers for other purposes like marking signals as
#"not available on this board", or indicating faults.  Code that doesn't
#touch the underlying hardware treats these integers as opaque cookies.
#
#Platforms define how they use those integers, and usually #define symbols
#for the GPIO lines so that board-specific setup code directly corresponds
#to the relevant schematics.  In contrast, drivers should only use GPIO
#numbers passed to them from that setup code, using platform_data to hold
#board-specific pin configuration data (along with other board specific
#data they need).  That avoids portability problems.

GPIOは、0からMAX_INTの範囲の、符号なし整数によって識別されます。
識別値は、負の値をほかの目的のために予約しており、
例えば「このボードでは利用できない」といった信号をマーキングしたり、障害を示します。
基盤となるハードウェアに触れていないコードでは、不透明なクッキーとしてこれらの整数を扱います。

プラットフォームは、自身でそれらの整数を使用する方法を定義し、
ボード固有のセットアップコードは、直接関連する回路図に対応しているので、
通常はGPIOラインを"#define"でシンボル定義します。
これとは対照的に、ドライバーは、(ドライバが必要とする他のボード固有のデータと一緒に)
ボード固有のピン設定データを保持するためのplatform_dataを使用し、
セットアップコードから渡されたGPIO番号を使用する必要があります。
これらにより、移植性の問題を回避できます。


#So for example one platform uses numbers 32-159 for GPIOs; while another
#uses numbers 0..63 with one set of GPIO controllers, 64-79 with another
#type of GPIO controller, and on one particular board 80-95 with an FPGA.
#The numbers need not be contiguous; either of those platforms could also
#use numbers 2000-2063 to identify GPIOs in a bank of I2C GPIO expanders.

したがって、たとえば、あるプラットフォームは、GPIOのために数字の32から159を使用しています。
0..63の数値を1セットのGPIOコントローラが使用し、
64..79は別のGPIOコントローラが使用し、
ある特定のボードは、FPGAで80..95を使います。
番号は連続している必要はありません。
これらのプラットフォームのいずれかは、I2C GPIO expnderのバンクにあるGPIOを識別するために、
2000から2063を使うこともできます。


#If you want to initialize a structure with an invalid GPIO number, use
#some negative number (perhaps "-EINVAL"); that will never be valid.  To
#test if a number could reference a GPIO, you may use this predicate:

無効なGPIO番号で構造体を初期化したい場合は、いくつかの負の数(おそらく"-EINVAL")を使用します。
それが有効ではありません。
ある数が、GPIOを参照できるかどうかをテストするには、以下を使用することができます。

#	int gpio_is_valid(int number);
#
#A number that's not valid will be rejected by calls which may request
#or free GPIOs (see below).  Other numbers may also be rejected; for
#example, a number might be valid but unused on a given board.

無効な番号で、GPIOの要求(前述)や解放(後述)を呼び出すと、拒否されます。
他の番号も拒否することができ、例えば、番号が与えられたボード上で有効ですが、使用されない可能性がある場合です。


#Whether a platform supports multiple GPIO controllers is currently a
#platform-specific implementation issue.

プラットフォームが複数のGPIOコントローラをサポートするかは、現状、プラットフォーム固有の実装問題です。


Using GPIOs
-----------
#The first thing a system should do with a GPIO is allocate it, using
#the gpio_request() call; see later.
GPIOで何かをするためにシステムが行うべき最初のことは、
gpio_request()呼び出しを使って、アロケートすることです。


#One of the next things to do with a GPIO, often in board setup code when
#setting up a platform_device using the GPIO, is mark its direction:

GPIOで何かする次の作業の一つは、その方向をマークすることです。:
GPIOを使用してplatform_deviceを設定する際、多くの場合、ボードのセットアップコードで行います。

#	/* set as input or output, returning 0 or negative errno */
#	int gpio_direction_input(unsigned gpio);
#	int gpio_direction_output(unsigned gpio, int value);

#The return value is zero for success, else a negative errno.  It should
#be checked, since the get/set calls don't have error returns and since
#misconfiguration is possible.  You should normally issue these calls from
#a task context.  However, for spinlock-safe GPIOs it's OK to use them
#before tasking is enabled, as part of early board setup.

返値がゼロなら成功、他は負のerrnoです。
返値はチェックすべきです。なぜならば、get/set呼び出しはエラー応答が無く、
設定誤りが可能となってしまうためです。
通常は、タスクコンテキストから、これらの呼び出しを発行する必要があります。
しかし、spinlock-safeなGPIOについては、earlyボードセットアップの一部のように
taskingが有効になる前に呼び出すことはOKです。

#For output GPIOs, the value provided becomes the initial output value.
#This helps avoid signal glitching during system startup.

GPIO出力については、与えられた(第二引数の)valueは、出力値の初期値になります。
システムスタートアップ中の信号グリッチ抑制の助けとなります。


#For compatibility with legacy interfaces to GPIOs, setting the direction
#of a GPIO implicitly requests that GPIO (see below) if it has not been
#requested already.  That compatibility is being removed from the optional
#gpiolib framework.

GPIOへのレガシインタフェースとの互換性のため、GPIOの方向を設定すると、
まだ要求されていない場合には、暗黙のうちに、GPIO(下記参照)が要求します。
その互換性は、オプションのgpiolib・フレームワークから削除されています。

#Setting the direction can fail if the GPIO number is invalid, or when
#that particular GPIO can't be used in that mode.  It's generally a bad
#idea to rely on boot firmware to have set the direction correctly, since
#it probably wasn't validated to do more than boot Linux.  (Similarly,
#that board setup code probably needs to multiplex that pin as a GPIO,
#and configure pullups/pulldowns appropriately.)

方向の設定は失敗することができます。
GPIO番号が無効であったり、所望のGPIOが指定されたモードで使えない場合です。
おそらく、Linuxを起動させる以上のことをするためには検証されなかったので、
正しく方向を設定したのは、ブートファームウェアに依存することが一般的に悪いアイデアだ。
(同様に、ボードセットアップコードは、マルチプレックス設定をGPIOにして、
適切にプルアップ/プルダウン設定を行う必要があるだろう)

★訳注:
 ボード依存部でpin mux設定・pull up/down設定関数を提供する例を見かける。
 arch/armのfreescale提供あたりを参照すると良いだろう…。


Spinlock-Safe GPIO access
-------------------------
#Most GPIO controllers can be accessed with memory read/write instructions.
#That doesn't need to sleep, and can safely be done from inside IRQ handlers.
#(That includes hardirq contexts on RT kernels.)

ほとんどのGPIOコントローラは、メモリ読み書き命令でアクセスすることができる。
この場合、スリープする必要が無く、IRQハンドラ内から安全に実行できる。
(RT kernelのhardirqコンテキストも含む。)

#Use these calls to access such GPIOs:
このようなのGPIOにアクセスするためにこれらの呼び出しを使用します。

	/* GPIO INPUT:  return zero or nonzero */
	int gpio_get_value(unsigned gpio);

	/* GPIO OUTPUT */
	void gpio_set_value(unsigned gpio, int value);

#The values are boolean, zero for low, nonzero for high.  When reading the
#value of an output pin, the value returned should be what's seen on the
#pin ... that won't always match the specified output value, because of
#issues including open-drain signaling and output latencies.

値はbooleanで、ゼロがlow、非ゼロがhighになります。
出力ピンの値を読み出したとき、返値は、そのピンで見える値を返すべき...
で、与えられた出力値と必ずしも一致するわけでは無い。
なぜならば、出力ラッチやオープンドレイン要因を含むためである。
★訳注:"出力ラッチ"は、ハードウェア構成上、read backすると設定した値を読んでしまうものがあるため。
 データシートを熟読しましょう。出力設定値と端子の読み出し値と読む場所の違うものもあるので、
 最終的にそのSoC用のGPIO driverまで舐めておかないと、何を見ているかがわからないです。

#The get/set calls have no error returns because "invalid GPIO" should have
#been reported earlier from gpio_direction_*().  However, note that not all
#platforms can read the value of output pins; those that can't should always
#return zero.  Also, using these calls for GPIOs that can't safely be accessed
#without sleeping (see below) is an error.

get/set呼び出しは、gpio_direction_*()関数からのエラー通知として"invalid GPIO"を先に受け取るので、エラーを返さない。
しかし、すべてのプラットフォームで出力ピンの値を読めないことに注意しましょう。
出力ピンの値が読めない場合は、常にゼロを返すべき?できないようにすべき?
GPIOのために、スリープなしに安全にアクセスできず、この呼び出しを使うことも、エラーです。


Platform-specific implementations are encouraged to optimize the two
calls to access the GPIO value in cases where the GPIO number (and for
output, value) are constant.  It's normal for them to need only a couple
of instructions in such cases (reading or writing a hardware register),
and not to need spinlocks.  Such optimized calls can make bitbanging
applications a lot more efficient (in both space and time) than spending
dozens of instructions on subroutine calls.

プラットフォーム固有の実装は、GPIO番号(と、出力であれば、その値)が
一定である場合には、GPIOの値にアクセスするために
2つの呼び出しを最適化することが推奨される。
このような(ハードウェアレジスタを読み書きするような)場合には、
少しの命令のを必要とし、スピンロックを必要としないのは正常です。
このような最適化された呼び出しは、サブルーチンコールの指示の数十を費やすよりも
(空間と時間の両方で)多くの、より効率的なbitbangingアプリケーションを行うことができます。

★この説明がよくわからぬ。またいずれ戻ってくるかな。。。


GPIO access that may sleep
--------------------------
Some GPIO controllers must be accessed using message based busses like I2C
or SPI.  Commands to read or write those GPIO values require waiting to
get to the head of a queue to transmit a command and get its response.
This requires sleeping, which can't be done from inside IRQ handlers.

Platforms that support this type of GPIO distinguish them from other GPIOs
by returning nonzero from this call (which requires a valid GPIO number,
which should have been previously allocated with gpio_request):

	int gpio_cansleep(unsigned gpio);

To access such GPIOs, a different set of accessors is defined:

	/* GPIO INPUT:  return zero or nonzero, might sleep */
	int gpio_get_value_cansleep(unsigned gpio);

	/* GPIO OUTPUT, might sleep */
	void gpio_set_value_cansleep(unsigned gpio, int value);

Other than the fact that these calls might sleep, and will not be ignored
for GPIOs that can't be accessed from IRQ handlers, these calls act the
same as the spinlock-safe calls.


Claiming and Releasing GPIOs
----------------------------
To help catch system configuration errors, two calls are defined.

	/* request GPIO, returning 0 or negative errno.
	 * non-null labels may be useful for diagnostics.
	 */
	int gpio_request(unsigned gpio, const char *label);

	/* release previously-claimed GPIO */
	void gpio_free(unsigned gpio);

Passing invalid GPIO numbers to gpio_request() will fail, as will requesting
GPIOs that have already been claimed with that call.  The return value of
gpio_request() must be checked.  You should normally issue these calls from
a task context.  However, for spinlock-safe GPIOs it's OK to request GPIOs
before tasking is enabled, as part of early board setup.

These calls serve two basic purposes.  One is marking the signals which
are actually in use as GPIOs, for better diagnostics; systems may have
several hundred potential GPIOs, but often only a dozen are used on any
given board.  Another is to catch conflicts, identifying errors when
(a) two or more drivers wrongly think they have exclusive use of that
signal, or (b) something wrongly believes it's safe to remove drivers
needed to manage a signal that's in active use.  That is, requesting a
GPIO can serve as a kind of lock.

Some platforms may also use knowledge about what GPIOs are active for
power management, such as by powering down unused chip sectors and, more
easily, gating off unused clocks.

Note that requesting a GPIO does NOT cause it to be configured in any
way; it just marks that GPIO as in use.  Separate code must handle any
pin setup (e.g. controlling which pin the GPIO uses, pullup/pulldown).

Also note that it's your responsibility to have stopped using a GPIO
before you free it.


GPIOs mapped to IRQs
--------------------
GPIO numbers are unsigned integers; so are IRQ numbers.  These make up
two logically distinct namespaces (GPIO 0 need not use IRQ 0).  You can
map between them using calls like:

	/* map GPIO numbers to IRQ numbers */
	int gpio_to_irq(unsigned gpio);

	/* map IRQ numbers to GPIO numbers (avoid using this) */
	int irq_to_gpio(unsigned irq);

Those return either the corresponding number in the other namespace, or
else a negative errno code if the mapping can't be done.  (For example,
some GPIOs can't be used as IRQs.)  It is an unchecked error to use a GPIO
number that wasn't set up as an input using gpio_direction_input(), or
to use an IRQ number that didn't originally come from gpio_to_irq().

These two mapping calls are expected to cost on the order of a single
addition or subtraction.  They're not allowed to sleep.

Non-error values returned from gpio_to_irq() can be passed to request_irq()
or free_irq().  They will often be stored into IRQ resources for platform
devices, by the board-specific initialization code.  Note that IRQ trigger
options are part of the IRQ interface, e.g. IRQF_TRIGGER_FALLING, as are
system wakeup capabilities.

Non-error values returned from irq_to_gpio() would most commonly be used
with gpio_get_value(), for example to initialize or update driver state
when the IRQ is edge-triggered.  Note that some platforms don't support
this reverse mapping, so you should avoid using it.


Emulating Open Drain Signals
----------------------------
Sometimes shared signals need to use "open drain" signaling, where only the
low signal level is actually driven.  (That term applies to CMOS transistors;
"open collector" is used for TTL.)  A pullup resistor causes the high signal
level.  This is sometimes called a "wire-AND"; or more practically, from the
negative logic (low=true) perspective this is a "wire-OR".

One common example of an open drain signal is a shared active-low IRQ line.
Also, bidirectional data bus signals sometimes use open drain signals.

Some GPIO controllers directly support open drain outputs; many don't.  When
you need open drain signaling but your hardware doesn't directly support it,
there's a common idiom you can use to emulate it with any GPIO pin that can
be used as either an input or an output:

 LOW:	gpio_direction_output(gpio, 0) ... this drives the signal
	and overrides the pullup.

 HIGH:	gpio_direction_input(gpio) ... this turns off the output,
	so the pullup (or some other device) controls the signal.

If you are "driving" the signal high but gpio_get_value(gpio) reports a low
value (after the appropriate rise time passes), you know some other component
is driving the shared signal low.  That's not necessarily an error.  As one
common example, that's how I2C clocks are stretched:  a slave that needs a
slower clock delays the rising edge of SCK, and the I2C master adjusts its
signaling rate accordingly.


What do these conventions omit?
===============================
One of the biggest things these conventions omit is pin multiplexing, since
this is highly chip-specific and nonportable.  One platform might not need
explicit multiplexing; another might have just two options for use of any
given pin; another might have eight options per pin; another might be able
to route a given GPIO to any one of several pins.  (Yes, those examples all
come from systems that run Linux today.)

Related to multiplexing is configuration and enabling of the pullups or
pulldowns integrated on some platforms.  Not all platforms support them,
or support them in the same way; and any given board might use external
pullups (or pulldowns) so that the on-chip ones should not be used.
(When a circuit needs 5 kOhm, on-chip 100 kOhm resistors won't do.)
Likewise drive strength (2 mA vs 20 mA) and voltage (1.8V vs 3.3V) is a
platform-specific issue, as are models like (not) having a one-to-one
correspondence between configurable pins and GPIOs.

There are other system-specific mechanisms that are not specified here,
like the aforementioned options for input de-glitching and wire-OR output.
Hardware may support reading or writing GPIOs in gangs, but that's usually
configuration dependent:  for GPIOs sharing the same bank.  (GPIOs are
commonly grouped in banks of 16 or 32, with a given SOC having several such
banks.)  Some systems can trigger IRQs from output GPIOs, or read values
from pins not managed as GPIOs.  Code relying on such mechanisms will
necessarily be nonportable.

Dynamic definition of GPIOs is not currently standard; for example, as
a side effect of configuring an add-on board with some GPIO expanders.


GPIO implementor's framework (OPTIONAL)
=======================================
#As noted earlier, there is an optional implementation framework making it
#easier for platforms to support different kinds of GPIO controller using
#the same programming interface.  This framework is called "gpiolib".

前述のように、簡単にプラットフォームが同じプログラミング・インターフェースを使用して
GPIOコントローラの種類をサポートするために作る任意のフレームワークがある。
このフレームワークは、"gpiolib"と呼ばれています。

#As a debugging aid, if debugfs is available a /sys/kernel/debug/gpio file
#will be found there.  That will list all the controllers registered through
#this framework, and the state of the GPIOs currently in use.

debugfsのが利用可能な場合は、デバッグ用に、/sys/kernel/debug/gpioファイルがそこに現れます。
つまり、すべてこのフレームワークを通じて登録されたコントローラ、
および現在使用されているのGPIOの状態が一覧表示されます。

★"mount -t debugfs nodev マウント先"でマウントしましょう。


Controller Drivers: gpio_chip
-----------------------------
In this framework each GPIO controller is packaged as a "struct gpio_chip"
with information common to each controller of that type:

 - methods to establish GPIO direction
 - methods used to access GPIO values
 - flag saying whether calls to its methods may sleep
 - optional debugfs dump method (showing extra state like pullup config)
 - label for diagnostics

There is also per-instance data, which may come from device.platform_data:
the number of its first GPIO, and how many GPIOs it exposes.

The code implementing a gpio_chip should support multiple instances of the
controller, possibly using the driver model.  That code will configure each
gpio_chip and issue gpiochip_add().  Removing a GPIO controller should be
rare; use gpiochip_remove() when it is unavoidable.

Most often a gpio_chip is part of an instance-specific structure with state
not exposed by the GPIO interfaces, such as addressing, power management,
and more.  Chips such as codecs will have complex non-GPIO state.

Any debugfs dump method should normally ignore signals which haven't been
requested as GPIOs.  They can use gpiochip_is_requested(), which returns
either NULL or the label associated with that GPIO when it was requested.


Platform Support
----------------
To support this framework, a platform's Kconfig will "select" either
ARCH_REQUIRE_GPIOLIB or ARCH_WANT_OPTIONAL_GPIOLIB
and arrange that its <asm/gpio.h> includes <asm-generic/gpio.h> and defines
three functions: gpio_get_value(), gpio_set_value(), and gpio_cansleep().
They may also want to provide a custom value for ARCH_NR_GPIOS.

ARCH_REQUIRE_GPIOLIB means that the gpio-lib code will always get compiled
into the kernel on that architecture.

ARCH_WANT_OPTIONAL_GPIOLIB means the gpio-lib code defaults to off and the user
can enable it and build it into the kernel optionally.

If neither of these options are selected, the platform does not support
GPIOs through GPIO-lib and the code cannot be enabled by the user.

Trivial implementations of those functions can directly use framework
code, which always dispatches through the gpio_chip:

  #define gpio_get_value	__gpio_get_value
  #define gpio_set_value	__gpio_set_value
  #define gpio_cansleep		__gpio_cansleep

Fancier implementations could instead define those as inline functions with
logic optimizing access to specific SOC-based GPIOs.  For example, if the
referenced GPIO is the constant "12", getting or setting its value could
cost as little as two or three instructions, never sleeping.  When such an
optimization is not possible those calls must delegate to the framework
code, costing at least a few dozen instructions.  For bitbanged I/O, such
instruction savings can be significant.

For SOCs, platform-specific code defines and registers gpio_chip instances
for each bank of on-chip GPIOs.  Those GPIOs should be numbered/labeled to
match chip vendor documentation, and directly match board schematics.  They
may well start at zero and go up to a platform-specific limit.  Such GPIOs
are normally integrated into platform initialization to make them always be
available, from arch_initcall() or earlier; they can often serve as IRQs.


Board Support
-------------
For external GPIO controllers -- such as I2C or SPI expanders, ASICs, multi
function devices, FPGAs or CPLDs -- most often board-specific code handles
registering controller devices and ensures that their drivers know what GPIO
numbers to use with gpiochip_add().  Their numbers often start right after
platform-specific GPIOs.

For example, board setup code could create structures identifying the range
of GPIOs that chip will expose, and passes them to each GPIO expander chip
using platform_data.  Then the chip driver's probe() routine could pass that
data to gpiochip_add().

Initialization order can be important.  For example, when a device relies on
an I2C-based GPIO, its probe() routine should only be called after that GPIO
becomes available.  That may mean the device should not be registered until
calls for that GPIO can work.  One way to address such dependencies is for
such gpio_chip controllers to provide setup() and teardown() callbacks to
board specific code; those board specific callbacks would register devices
once all the necessary resources are available, and remove them later when
the GPIO controller device becomes unavailable.


Sysfs Interface for Userspace (OPTIONAL)
========================================
Platforms which use the "gpiolib" implementors framework may choose to
configure a sysfs user interface to GPIOs.  This is different from the
debugfs interface, since it provides control over GPIO direction and
value instead of just showing a gpio state summary.  Plus, it could be
present on production systems without debugging support.

Given appropriate hardware documentation for the system, userspace could
know for example that GPIO #23 controls the write protect line used to
protect boot loader segments in flash memory.  System upgrade procedures
may need to temporarily remove that protection, first importing a GPIO,
then changing its output state, then updating the code before re-enabling
the write protection.  In normal use, GPIO #23 would never be touched,
and the kernel would have no need to know about it.

Again depending on appropriate hardware documentation, on some systems
userspace GPIO can be used to determine system configuration data that
standard kernels won't know about.  And for some tasks, simple userspace
GPIO drivers could be all that the system really needs.

Note that standard kernel drivers exist for common "LEDs and Buttons"
GPIO tasks:  "leds-gpio" and "gpio_keys", respectively.  Use those
instead of talking directly to the GPIOs; they integrate with kernel
frameworks better than your userspace code could.


Paths in Sysfs
--------------
/sys/class/gpioには、3種類のエントリーが存在する。
 - GPIOsを超えて、ユーザ空間制御を取得するための制御インタフェース
 - GPIO自身
 - GPIO コントローラ("gpio_chip"の実態)

'device'へのsymbolic-linkを含んだ、標準的なファイルも加わります。
制御インタフェースは、書き込みのみ有効です。
#There are three kinds of entry in /sys/class/gpio:
#   - Control interfaces used to get userspace control over GPIOs;
#   - GPIOs themselves; and
#   - GPIO controllers ("gpio_chip" instances).
#
#That's in addition to standard files including the "device" symlink.
#The control interfaces are write-only:

 /sys/class/gpio/
  "export" : GPIOの番号をこのファイルに書き込むことで, ユーザ空間GPIOの制御を輸出できるか(貸し出せるか)を問います。
  "unexport" : ユーザ空間への輸出効果を反転します(借り出したGPIOを返却する)

# /sys/class/gpio/
#   "export" ... Userspace may ask the kernel to export control of a GPIO to userspace by writing its number to this file.
#
#  Example:  "echo 19 > export" will create a "gpio19" node for GPIO #19, if that's not requested by kernel code.
#
#   "unexport" ... Reverses the effect of exporting to userspace.
#  Example:  "echo 19 > unexport" will remove a "gpio19" node exported using the "export" file.


GPIO signals have paths like /sys/class/gpio/gpio42/ (for GPIO #42) and have the following read/write attributes:

    /sys/class/gpio/gpioN/

 "direction"
  この値は通常は書き込むことができます。
  "out"を書くと、初期値としてlowが設定されます。
  グリッチフリー動作を保証するために、"low"と"high"の値は、
  その初期値が出力としてGPIOを構成するために書き込むことができます。

  注意:このattributeは存在しないかもしれません。
  kernelがGPIOの方向制御をサポートしていなかったり、
  kernel空間でexportされており, ユーザ空間でのGPIO方向制御を許可していない場合など。

#	"direction" ... reads as either "in" or "out".  This value may
#		normally be written.  Writing as "out" defaults to
#		initializing the value as low.  To ensure glitch free
#		operation, values "low" and "high" may be written to
#		configure the GPIO as an output with that initial value.

		Note that this attribute *will not exist* if the kernel
		doesn't support changing the direction of a GPIO, or
		it was exported by kernel code that didn't explicitly
		allow userspace to reconfigure this GPIO's direction.

 "value"
  GPIOが出力に設定されているならば、この値が書かれる。
  非ゼロの値が'high'と見なされる。

#	"value" ... reads as either 0 (low) or 1 (high).  If the GPIO
#		is configured as an output, this value may be written;
#		any nonzero value is treated as high.

 "edge"
  読み出すと、"none", "rising", "falling", "both"のいずれかが見える。
  信号のエッヂ選択のために、これらの文字列を書くと、"value"ファイル上で、poll(2)が効く。
  このファイルは、入力割り込み生成可能なピンにのみ現れる。

#	"edge" ... reads as either "none", "rising", "falling", or
#		"both". Write these strings to select the signal edge(s)
#		that will make poll(2) on the "value" file return.
#
#		This file exists only if the pin can be configured as an
#		interrupt generating input pin.

	"active_low" ... reads as either 0 (false) or 1 (true).  Write
		any nonzero value to invert the value attribute both
		for reading and writing.  Existing and subsequent
		poll(2) support configuration via the edge attribute
		for "rising" and "falling" edges will follow this
		setting.

GPIO controllers have paths like /sys/class/gpio/gpiochip42/ (for the
controller implementing GPIOs starting at #42) and have the following
read-only attributes:

    /sys/class/gpio/gpiochipN/

    	"base" ... same as N, the first GPIO managed by this chip

    	"label" ... provided for diagnostics (not always unique)

    	"ngpio" ... how many GPIOs this manges (N to N + ngpio - 1)

Board documentation should in most cases cover what GPIOs are used for
what purposes.  However, those numbers are not always stable; GPIOs on
a daughtercard might be different depending on the base board being used,
or other cards in the stack.  In such cases, you may need to use the
gpiochip nodes (possibly in conjunction with schematics) to determine
the correct GPIO number to use for a given signal.


Exporting from Kernel code
--------------------------
Kernel code can explicitly manage exports of GPIOs which have already been
requested using gpio_request():

	/* export the GPIO to userspace */
	int gpio_export(unsigned gpio, bool direction_may_change);

	/* reverse gpio_export() */
	void gpio_unexport();

	/* create a sysfs link to an exported GPIO node */
	int gpio_export_link(struct device *dev, const char *name,
		unsigned gpio)

	/* change the polarity of a GPIO node in sysfs */
	int gpio_sysfs_set_active_low(unsigned gpio, int value);

After a kernel driver requests a GPIO, it may only be made available in
the sysfs interface by gpio_export().  The driver can control whether the
signal direction may change.  This helps drivers prevent userspace code
from accidentally clobbering important system state.

This explicit exporting can help with debugging (by making some kinds
of experiments easier), or can provide an always-there interface that's
suitable for documenting as part of a board support package.

After the GPIO has been exported, gpio_export_link() allows creating
symlinks from elsewhere in sysfs to the GPIO sysfs node.  Drivers can
use this to provide the interface under their own device in sysfs with
a descriptive name.

Drivers can use gpio_sysfs_set_active_low() to hide GPIO line polarity
differences between boards from user space.  This only affects the
sysfs interface.  Polarity change can be done both before and after
gpio_export(), and previously enabled poll(2) support for either
rising or falling edge will be reconfigured to follow this setting.

OK キャンセル 確認 その他